Friday's Flight Bag. An Aviation Blog by Owen Zupp.

Owen Zupp - Friday, February 24, 2012

                    "Traffic Ahead." A very popular image on the blog this past week.

 

Hi All,

Thanks once again for a tremendous week at this aviation blog. Your support just keeps on growing!

The choice of highlighting the most popular blogs is getting more difficult each week as the numbers seem to be rising right across the range of stories. In a news sense, the post on the collapse of 'Air Australia' seemed to strike a nerve. As a series, 'The Practical Pilot' seems to be very popular, so you can be sure that more of that style of content will be on its way. Similarly, the second instalment of 'The Fatal Stall' inspired quite an amount of comment and feedback; particularly given the fate of Air France 447 in more recent times.

I would like to humbly thank Karlene Pettit for mentioning this blog and profiling me at her very popular website. I also received my copy of her book, "Flight for Control", in the mail a couple of days ago and I recommend that you check it out at her website also.

Episode 82 from the lads at the PCDU podcast hit the airwaves where we chatted about topics like 'The Fatal Stall' and the recent Air Test of the GippsAero GA8 for 'Australian Aviation' magazine.

Well, you've probably grasped that it's been another busy week and I'm currently organising content for the seven days ahead. It's a significant task, but the ongoing support of this aviation blog is making it all worthwhile.

Please keep the feedback and comments coming and don't forget to subscribe to this website or 'Like' me on Facebook.

Cheers for now,

Owen

Boeing Dusk. An Aviation Blog Image by Owen Zupp.

Owen Zupp - Wednesday, January 25, 2012

...readying for departure from Hervey Bay, Queensland.

 

Learning to Fly at www.owenzupp.com. An Aviation Blog by Owen Zupp.

Owen Zupp - Monday, January 23, 2012

Hi All,

Firstly, thank you again for the amazing response to my new website and blog. The number of visitors continues to grow rapidly each day, from the farthest reaches of this amazing planet.

Of particular interest are the messages and questions that I am receiving about the varied aspects of aviation. From pursuing a career as a pilot to the subtle points of aerodynamics, commercial aviation, private flying and more. Consequently, I will tailor my content to what you good people are calling for, so standby for some diversity!

I will continue to post photos and footage in addition to the articles as it is apparent that a glimpse from the cockpit is always popular and may well be worth "a thousand words". I'll also look at learning to fly and discuss some of the common principles of flight. Really, the possibilities are endless, so please continue to contact me and let me know what you want. I'll be only too happy to respond with more new content.

Thanks again and please continue to share this exciting journey with me.

 

So you want to be a pilot? An Aviation Blog by Owen Zupp.

Owen Zupp - Tuesday, December 20, 2011

 

So You Want to be a Pilot.....

 By Owen Zupp.

 

 Author of 'Solo Flight' and '50 Tales of Flight'


I recently took a young lad for a flight over our local district; just a dawdle for half an hour or so. He keenly looked down upon the earth with that bright-eyed enthusiasm that all youngsters with dreams of flight in their hearts tend to do. For me, it’s over forty years since my father shared that experience with me for the first time, although I still vividly remember the ground falling away from the Cessna’s wheel outside my window. It was liberating and to quote John Gillespie Magee’s immortal poem ‘High Flight’, I truly felt that we had “slipped the surly bonds of Earth”. The fuse had been lit and the fire was to rage inside me until my turn came to take my own aircraft aloft.

Along the way the journey would prove to be both a struggle and an adventure. There would be weeks where the wage only just covered the rent but there would be nights where the sounds of the New Guinea jungle would play an amazing tune as I hung in my hammock. There would be life in a caravan in the midst of 40 degree heat and nights where the ice was getting so thick on the wings that I was sure there was no way out. I would bury good friends who had fallen in harm’s way and bury relationships that couldn’t overcome the distance and absence. But at the end of the day, I was flying.

Aviation was much more than a career choice for me; it was more akin to facilitating a passion or feeding an addiction. I had never possessed an alternative ‘life plan’ and always figured that I’d never need one. Yet now as I contemplate aviation on another 3am drive to the airport, I question whether it is everything thing to me that it once was. Had the dream become little more than a means to an end? For so much has changed in the industry that it is almost unrecognisable when compared to that first flight in the tiny, gleaming Cessna of the 1960s.

 

 

The face of the pilot has been through many transformations over the last century. From fledgling pioneers to heroic knights of the air, the aviators were seen as keen, strong and fearless. And in those days they definitely needed to be, although a little dose of ‘crazy’ was also a useful ingredient in the mix. When the world found the post-war peace of the 1950s and the airliners began to span the globe, it was not so much heroism as glamour that now painted the picture of the pilot. Exotic foreign lands and five-star hotels were the office, while the flight deck laid at his feet views of grand diversity. And they were ‘his’ feet as the airlines were still a man’s domain. Obviously this imbalance needed to change and finally it did when it was realised that women could actually operate airliners just as efficiently as their male counterparts. But while this door opening was a change for the better, it was far from the only change.

Jet travel saw the slashing of flight times and crossing the globe slowly moved further away from its former perception of luxury travel that was more akin to a cruise liner. World travel became big business where deals across borders could be sealed with a handshake in a matter of hours, rather than days. Passengers no longer had to layover in exotic ports, but could catch connecting flights and travel through the night to be home days earlier. And while these changes offered up a variety of worthwhile options for the customer, the role of the airline pilot was beginning to change.

And change it did. No longer did the role resemble the ship’s captain surveying the world from the bridge, instead the pilot became more closely related to the hard-working truck driver. Additionally, the security needs of a fragile world meant that air-crews were faceless creatures secured away in a bullet-proof flight deck. Like a rare species of nocturnal mammal, a glimpse of them could be caught if you happened to be in just the right place at the right time. The children’s visits to the flight deck were now a thing of the past and announcements about the world passing outside the windows were replaced by in-seat entertainment and iPods.

 

 

As fuel prices rose and fiscal reality rammed home, the five-star stop-overs disappeared. Low-cost carriers emerged to place further pressure on the bottom line of an already capital intensive industry. In some quarters, pilots began to pay for their own training to effectively buy a ‘jet job’ and their wages dropped as well. Fiscal reality had arrived for aviation and its survival depended on squeezing every inch of efficiency out of the operation in what was now a highly competitive industry. Accordingly, multiple days of sight-seeing in ports became measured in hours before it was time to turn around and cross the Pacific Ocean or some great continent once more. Travel became more routine and frequent and over a far greater distance and time. Sleep became the really valuable commodity to the pilot and crews flying to Europe could routinely see their ‘body clock’ passing them in the opposite direction somewhere over Afghanistan. Days off at home would be spent re-adapting to the time-zone just before it was time to leave again. Similarly, domestic flying became a series of multi-sector days, with minimum turn-arounds at the hotel before the transport would be shuttling the crew back to the airport for another day in the saddle. Just as glamour had replaced heroism, routine and efficiency had become the pilot’s new benchmark.

It was still dark as I pulled into the airport car park to start another day in the flight levels. I spared a thought for the young lad with the gleam in his eye and a burning desire to fly. I contemplated my own career and wondered if I had foreseen the hours of study, the cost of training and the years of minimum wage and second jobs would I have been so enthusiastic? If I had foreseen the freezing cold pre-dawn, pre-flight inspections and the lonely hours waiting for passengers at hot remote airstrips, would I have accepted the challenge? If someone had told me that the airline operations would become just like any other job, would I have listened to them? If I had known then all that I know now, would I have ever chosen to be a pilot?

Yes.

Absolutely. In a heart-beat.

 

"So You Want to be a Pilot..." is an excerpt from the best-selling  '50 Tales of Flight'

 

 

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